There’s more work to do but we’re keeping our word and delivering on the mandate given to us by Albertans.

Check the status of all 374 promises below

  • Completed
  • In progress/Announced
  • On Hold
  • 1. Introduce Bill 1, The Carbon Tax Repeal Act
  • 2. Subject any future carbon tax to the Alberta Taxpayer Protection Act which requires all sales taxes to be voted on in a referendum
  • 3. Release detailed assessments of the impact of the carbon tax and the NDP’s “Climate Leadership Plan” on Alberta’s economy, and on key sectors including electricity, oil and gas, and homes
  • 4. Share an impact report with Albertans of the costs of adopting Justin Trudeau and the NDP’s plan for a $50/tonne carbon tax
  • 5. Challenge the constitutionality of the Trudeau carbon tax by filing a judicial reference to the Court of Appeal, while continuing to support similar challenges by the governments of Saskatchewan and Ontario
  • 6. Enact a Job Creation Tax Cut to reduce the general income tax rate on businesses from 12% to 8% over four years
  • 7. Keep the small business tax rate at 2%
  • 8. Further improve Alberta’s tax competitiveness once the budget is balanced
  • 9. Retain the general $15.00 minimum wage
  • 10. Introduce a Youth Job Creation Wage of $13.00 for workers who are 17 years of age or younger
  • 11. Appoint a Minimum Wage Expert Panel
  • 12. Analyse and publish all of the available economic data on the labour market impact of the NDP’s 50% increase in the minimum wage
  • 13. Assess whether hospitality industry workers who serve alcohol would likely generate higher net incomes (i.e. by working more hours) with a wage differential similar to those that exist in Ontario, Quebec, and British Columbia
  • 14. Return to a regular / irregular workday distinction for calculating holiday pay
  • 15. Return to a holiday pay qualifying period of 30 work days in the 12 months preceding a general holiday
  • 16. Reverse the change in 2018 that eliminated the option for workers and employers to develop straight-time banked hours arrangements (this has no impact on overtime pay)
  • 17. Restore the mandatory secret ballot for union certification votes
  • 18. Protect workers from being forced to fund political parties and causes without explicit opt-in approval
  • 19. Reverse the replacement worker ban in the public sector
  • 20. Require the Labour Relations Board to provide legal support to all union workers in order to better understand and exercise their rights
  • 21. Strengthen new provisions in the Labour Relations Code that have reduced the duplication of employment claims in multiple forums (such as labour relations, employment standards, arbitration, and privacy)
  • 22. Retain some of the new procedural powers given to the Labour Relations Board, Employment Standards, and labour arbitrators such as marshalling powers that allow the focusing of complaints
  • 23. Retain new procedures relating to the duty of fair representation (e.g. the obligation of union and its process to properly represent a union member)
  • 24. Retain the current essential services legislation
  • 25. New forms of leave adopted in recent legislation including:
    - Personal and Family Responsibility Leave
    - Long-Term Illness and Injury Leave
    - Bereavement Leave
    - Domestic Violence Leave
    - Citizenship Ceremony Leave
    - A new unpaid leave that provides up to a half-day of job protection for employees attending a citizenship ceremony
    - Critical Illness of an Adult Family Member
    - Critical Illness of a Child
    - Death or Disappearance of a Child
  • 26. Pass a Red Tape Reduction Act to measure, report, and reduce the province’s regulatory decisions to be made
  • 27. Appoint a Minister for Red Tape Reduction to lead the Action Plan and meet the one-third reduction target
  • 28. Form industry panels to help the Minister identify unnecessary red tape in every sector of Alberta’s economy
  • 29. Implement a “One-In / One-Out” rule requiring ministries to identify at least one offsetting regulation for every new regulation created
  • 30. Create a Red Tape Challenge Website at StopRedTape.ca to replicate the United Kingdom’s successful Red Tape Challenge
  • 31. Cut red tape within government to allow the public sector to focus on serving Albertans
  • 32. Move from a process to outcome-based regulatory approach
  • 33. Fight for an end to interprovincial barriers to free trade
  • 34. Launch comprehensive consultations with farmers and ranchers on the Farm Freedom and Safety Act (FFSA)
  • 35. The FFSA will Repeal Bill 6 (i.e. the 2015 Enhanced Protection for Farm and Ranch Workers Act )
  • 36. The FFSA will: Require employers to maintain workplace insurance for farm workers, but allow employers to choose whether to purchase insurance from the market or from the WCB as long as basic standards of coverage are met for such things as medical and return-to-work support services, and protection against loss of income
  • 37. The FFSA will: Exempt small farms from employment legislation, following the example of New Brunswick that exempts farms that “employ three or fewer employees over a substantial period of the year (not including family members)”
  • 38. The FFSA will: Ensure basic safety standards
  • 39. The FFSA will: Recognize that operating a farm is unlike operating a conventional business and that farmers and ranchers require much greater flexibility in meeting employment standards
  • 40. Minimize the red tape burden on farmers and ranchers
  • 41. Strengthen property rights by pursuing the constitutional entrenchment of property rights and adopting an Alberta Property Rights Protection Act
  • 42. Fight for market access and reduce interprovincial trade barriers to create jobs and grow our economy
  • 43. Streamline the Agriculture Financial Services Corporation to improve services and responsiveness to farmers
  • 44. Eliminate the carbon tax and reduce the corporate tax and red tape burden on farmers and ranchers by one-third
  • 45. Fight back against attacks on agriculture by well-funded special interests- in many ways, these resemble the campaign of vilification targeting Alberta’s energy industry in recent years
  • 46. Ensure that farmers, not government, set key agriculture research priorities
  • 47. Perform a comprehensive review of risk mitigation programs
  • 48. Consult on land sales in order to replace good agricultural land lost to urban expansion by cooperating with municipalities seeking auctions on parcels of Crown land for agricultural use, where appropriate. Such disposition of Crown land would be subject to consultation with First Nations communities and others. In one case, MacKenzie County seeks to complete an auction of about 100,000 acres. To put this request in perspective, there are approximately 100 million acres of Alberta Crown land
  • 49. Maintain the existing Government of Alberta Capital Plan for 2019/20 through 2022/23
  • 50. Pass the Alberta Infrastructure Accountability Act that will provide transparency on prioritization criteria, establish predictable funding levels, and ensure adequate maintenance of existing assets
  • 51. Use alternative financing, i.e. public-private partnerships (P3s), design and build, construction management, etc., for procurement of capital projects when there is a solid business case and value for money can be achieved for taxpayers
  • 52. Limit the use of “cost plus contracts” for procurement of capital projects
  • 53. Prepare and publicly release an annual Government of Alberta Infrastructure Report as part of the province’s Annual Report to provide detailed information to Albertans on the progress made in meeting the various commitments in the Five-Year Capital Plan
  • 54. Prepare and publicly release a 20-year Strategic Capital Plan for Alberta
  • 55. Guarantee in law that the royalty regime in place when a well is permitted will remain in place for that project in perpetuity
  • 56. Reclassify service rigs as off-road vehicles, such as farm equipment
  • 57. Replace rural road permits with an annual provincial permit
  • 58. Reclassify service rigs as provincial carriers even when crossing provincial boundaries
  • 59. Extend BOP Level IV certification from three to five years
  • 60. Extend mast and overhead equipment level IV certification from 1,000 to 2,000 operating days
  • 61. Ensure that Alberta intervenes at all Canadian Energy Regulator hearings that affect Alberta oil and gas interests
  • 62. Respect agreements made by the current government under the Petrochemical Diversification Program (PDP) and remain open to extending the PDP royalty tax credit model to incentivize future projects
  • 63. Appoint a new Board of Directors to the AER that will focus on improving approval times and cutting red tape
  • 64. Establish clear benchmarks for approval times, and maintain a public dashboard of the AER’s key performance metrics
  • 65. Aim to have the fastest approvals in North America, reducing AER timelines by at least 50%
  • 66. Streamline and expedite the AER’s review processes to bring greater certainty and stability to our investment climate
  • 67. Appoint an Associate Minister for Natural Gas
  • 68. Appoint an Associate Deputy Minister for Natural Gas in the Department of Energy
  • 69. Review and implement key recommendations of the 2018 Roadmap to Recovery (aka the Kvisle Panel)
  • 70. Increase regulatory efficiency and streamline project approvals to increase the pace of activity
  • 71. Work with producers, the National Energy Board, and TransCanada to evaluate changes to regulations and policies pertaining to the NGTL system, including tolls and tariffs, and interconnection to the TransCanada Pipeline System through to the export points in Saskatchewan and Manitoba
  • 72. Work with producers, TransCanada, and regulators to increase throughput, reduce price volatility, and lower shipper tolls on major natural gas pipeline systems
  • 73. Work with the natural gas industry to facilitate infrastructure for shipping Alberta gas to Asian markets through Liquefied Natural Gas projects
  • 74. Streamline the process for well and facility abandonment and environmental reclamation to reduce costs and increase the rate at which wells that will not be used again are officially “abandoned”
  • 75. Work jointly with the AER and industry to overhaul the liability management framework in Alberta, ensuring liabilities are covered without unduly discouraging new investment
  • 76. Propose that the federal government provide tax incentives and financial support such as “green” flow-through shares for the abandonment and environmental reclamation of oil and gas wells and associated surface facilities
  • 77. Urge the federal government to establish alternative financial vehicles that focus on environmental reclamation in the oil and gas industry, such as adapting Qualifying Environmental Trusts (QET) to include well decommissioning costs
  • 78. Bring in a new Technology Innovation and Emissions Reductions (TIER) regime for large industrial emitters in Alberta effective January 1, 2020
  • 79. Reduce the compliance price from $30/tonne to $20/tonne
  • 80. Require large final emitters (LFEs) in the electricity sector to meet a “good-as-best-gas” performance standard, which means that over 60% of coal fired electricity emissions will be subject to compliance
  • 81. Implement a TIER Fund which will help companies reduce emissions with cleaner technology
  • 82. End costly subsidies after the Renewable Energy Program’s round 3
  • 83. Ask the Auditor General of Alberta to conduct a special duty audit of the NDP-incurred financial losses on the power purchase agreements held through the Balancing Pool
  • 84. Immediately tender a bid for a comprehensive independent assessment of the costs of the NDP Climate Leadership Plan
  • 85. Consult on whether Alberta should return to an energy-only market or create a capacity market, reporting back to Albertans within 90-days
  • 86. Welcome market-driven green power to Alberta and the jobs that such renewable energy producers will create
  • 87. Direct Travel Alberta to work with tourism stakeholders to develop a new 10-year Tourism Strategy recognizing the role that the private sector can play in assisting government in promoting Alberta as a tourist destination
  • 88. Reorient the mandate of Travel Alberta towards more active facilitation of private sector funding and public-private partnerships for its tourism marketing and promotion activities
  • 89. Reprofile a portion of existing government funding for tourism into a Tourism Partnership Incentive Fund (TPIF), managed through Travel Alberta, to attract and identify sources of private sector support for tourism
  • 90. Remove intrusive laws, rules, and regulations which impede the development of Alberta’s tourism sector
  • 91. Work with the federal government and airport authorities in Calgary and Edmonton to expand air transport agreements and get more flights to Alberta from tourist source countries
  • 92. Establish a target to double tourism spending in Alberta to $20 billion by 2030
  • 93. Make tourism the responsibility of the Minister of Economic Development and Trade
  • 94. Ensure that forest companies have long-term access to a sustainable fibre supply with our Forest Jobs Guarantee, including current quotas and forest management agreements
  • 95. Offset federal or court-ordered policies that inhibit access to fibre with access to an equal or larger area for forestry in the same region
  • 96. Support environmentally sustainable forestry practices by working with Alberta’s forestry companies to optimize land management practices
  • 97. Reverse four years of NDP reductions in the fight against the mountain pine beetle by increasing funding by $5 million to $30 million annually
  • 98. Defend Alberta’s forest sector and fight for Alberta’s proper national share of trade-allocated export quotas
  • 99. Direct Alberta’s foreign trade offices to work with forestry companies to improve export opportunities, especially in Asia
  • 100. Immediately form a Caribou Range Task Force of local municipal governments, the Northwest Species at Risk Committee, forestry and other industries, Indigenous representatives, and habitat scientists to review the Alberta Caribou Draft Plan
  • 101. Ensure that the province’s land use consultations and planning are completed before any new long-term decisions are made on habitat protection
  • 102. Include Alberta’s forestry sector in our “fight back strategy” against foreign funded attacks on Alberta’s resources
  • 103. Ensure that the caribou range plan, and any other environment policies affecting the forestry industry, are subject to a comprehensive social-economic impact assessment
  • 104. Immediately launch consultations to develop the Alberta Advantage Immigration Strategy, which will be completed by the end of 2019. We will seek input from immigrants, employers, settlement organizations, municipalities, policy experts, and will study best practices in other provinces. The goal will be to end large backlogs, speed up processing times, proactively attract talented newcomers from overseas, and welcome job-creating entrepreneurs
  • 105. Create a Rural Entrepreneur Immigration Program that will invite entrepreneurs to start new businesses in smaller Alberta communities
  • 106. Create a Rural Renewal Immigration Program that would prioritize AINP applications from foreign nationals who are committed to living and working in smaller communities throughout Alberta
  • 107. Create the International Student Entrepreneur Program
  • 108. Create a Foreign Graduate Start-up Visa Program that will target brilliant foreign grads of top universities in the United States who want to launch a start-up enterprise in North America but cannot get immigration status in the USA
  • 109. Introduce the Fair Access to Regulated Professions and Compulsory Trades Act to help ensure that regulated professions and individuals applying are governed by registration practices that are transparent, objective, impartial, and fair
  • 110. Create a Fairness for Newcomers Office with a $2.5 million budget,9 and oversight from the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Immigration
  • 111. Work with trade and professional licensing bodies to streamline, simplify, and accelerate foreign credential recognition with a goal of giving applicants for licensure a clear answer within six months or less of their application
  • 112. Publicly identify and hold accountable those regulatory bodies that have unreasonable barriers to credential recognition
  • 113. Organize a Premier’s Summit on Fairness for Newcomers
  • 114. Put foreign credential recognition on the agenda of the First Ministers Meeting to push for faster action on the Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications, which is an effort to get regulatory bodies across Canada to harmonize their credentialing procedures
  • 115. Create an Alberta Government Mentorship for Newcomers Program to match immigrant professionals with mentors in the public service who can help to guide them through the process of credential recognition and finding employment at their skill level
  • 116. Support and expand the work of the International Qualifications Assessment Service that assesses foreign degrees against the Canadian post-secondary standard
  • 117. Work with non-profit groups like Windmill Micro lending (formerly the Alberta Immigrant Access Fund) to expand access to low-interest loans to immigrant professionals who need bridge financing to upgrade their skills and pay for certification exams
  • 118. Support the work of immigrant settlement agencies to offer skills upgrading to underemployed foreign professionals
  • 119. Work with the federal government to offer pre-arrival orientation to foreign nationals selected for permanent residency in Alberta to encourage them to apply for credential recognition and educational assessments before they arrive in Canada
  • 120. Drive innovation by creating the best business environment in Canada. A business wanting to expand and hire should view Alberta as the most attractive place in North America
  • 121. Fix the current approach to innovation funding by simplifying the way start-ups and growth companies secure public – and private – funding. We will reduce duplication and coordinate across the many investment agencies in the province. Investments of public money will have a clear ‘return on investment’ criteria
  • 122. Apply technology and process improvements to the government itself in order to lead by example. The government will actively engage in pilot projects to test global ‘best practices’ that can help deliver public services faster, more securely, and at lower cost
  • 123. Make Alberta a destination for global entrepreneurs through the creation of streams within the Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program
  • 124. Maintain or increase health spending and maintain a universally accessible, publicly funded health care system
  • 125. Reduce surgical wait times to no more than four months in four years by replicating elements of the highly successful Saskatchewan model for health care reform, the Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative (SSI). Reduce Surgical wait times by having all scheduled surgeries performed within clinically recommended timelines by 2023 (Cabinet approved Oct 8, 2020)
  • 126. Appoint an Associate Minister for Mental Health and Addictions to make this a political priority of a future government
  • 127. Invest $40 million over four years to launch an Opioid Response Strategy that expands support for opioid treatment centres to deal with wait times and increases access, including additional detox beds, mobile detox programs, and funding a new Virtual Opioid Dependency Program
  • 128. Establish a dedicated Opioid Enforcement Team within the Alberta Law Enforcement Response Team (ALERT) to target aggressive investigation and disruption of opioid manufacturing and dealing at a cost of $10 million over four years
  • 129. Expand the use of Drug Treatment Courts
  • 130. Call on the federal government to increase resources for drug interdiction and to restore mandatory minimum penal sentences for drug traffickers
  • 131. Ensure that provincial funding programs are determined based on evidence – including ensuring eligibility for successful faith-based models
  • 132. Work with physician groups to understand what more can be done to reduce the prescription of powerful opioid drugs that have a high incidence of addiction and ensure general practitioners have training in opioid replacement therapy
  • 133. Invest $100 million over four years to implement a Mental Health and Addiction Strategy based in part on the report of the Alberta Mental Health Review Committee
  • 134. Increase earlier access to addiction and mental health services through primary care centers
  • 135. Expand home care to support those who identify addiction and mental health as a primary concern
  • 136. Support Albertans in crisis by expanding programs to more communities including police and crisis teams, provincial family violence treatment programs, diversion programs and drug treatment courts, and by developing mental health court models
  • 137. Increase access to mental health services and reduce recidivism as well as use of emergency departments for those in contact with the criminal justice system
  • 138. Support First Nations, Métis, and Inuit people and communities by establishing a continuum of addiction and mental health services, ensuring service provision is not disrupted by jurisdictional disputes and increasing access to services to manage the impact of Indian Residential Schools on mental health
  • 139. Only endorse new supervised consumption sites if there have been extensive consultations with affected communities, including residents and business owners, and if there is a robust evidence-based analysis of the socio-economic impact of a potential drug consumption site
  • 140. Only endorse new Overdose Prevention Sites if they have clear plans to provide treatment services
  • 141. Conduct an evidence-based socio-economic analysis of the impact of existing drug consumption sites
  • 142. Consult with local communities, police, municipalities, and others on the location of existing sites to determine if they are optimal, or if better locations could be found that would reduce the impact of crime, discarded needles, and other negative social and economic impacts on local neighbourhoods
  • 143. Continue to shift from hospital to community-based home and hospice care
  • 144. Establish and implement palliative care education, training, and standards for health professionals
  • 145. Develop effective caregiver supports to support patients in their homes and community
  • 146. Raise public awareness of palliative care and how and when to access it
  • 147. Expand already successful innovations in the health care system, in particular the “medical home” care model of the Crowfoot Village Family Practice
  • 148. Conduct an Alberta Health Services Performance Review to identify administrative savings, and move that money to front-line services
  • 149. Increase the budget of the Alberta Health Quality Council (HQCA) by $1 million annually to establish more measurements and increase health care quality outcomes for patients
  • 150. Provide Albertans with increased choice of medical practitioners by increasing the number and scope of nurse practitioners in Alberta and allowing nurse practitioners the ability to bill directly to Alberta Health
  • 151. Expand the scope of practice of other health professionals, such as opticians, optometrists, and paramedics
  • 152. Lift the cap on midwifery services
  • 153. Review the Connect Care contract and My Health Care Records to reduce potential duplication of services and ensure maximum effectiveness
  • 154. Modernize paper health care cards to be combined with either driver’s licenses or provincial photo ID cards as a multi-use Personal Identification Card
  • 155. Save $200 million by stopping the NDP’s plan to buy laundry machines for AHS by maintaining more efficient, competitive contracting for these services
  • 156. Save $640 million by cancelling the NDP’s unnecessary ‘Superlab’ and nationalization of laboratory services
  • 157. Maintain or increase education funding while seeking greater efficiency by reducing administrative overhead and pushing resources to front line teachers
  • 158. Continue to build new schools, while ordering an immediate audit of class sizes to determine what happened to previous funding dedicated to class size reduction, and prioritize public infrastructure funds for schools and health care infrastructure
  • 159. End the focus on so-called “discovery” or “inquiry” learning, also known as constructivism, by repealing Ministerial Order #001/2013 and replacing it with a new Ministerial Order which focusses on teaching essential knowledge to help students develop foundational competencies
  • 160. Pause the NDP’s curriculum review, and broaden consultations to be open and transparent, including a wider range of perspectives from parents, teachers, and subject matter experts
  • 161. Curriculum reform should begin by determining the key knowledge and skills that Alberta students should possess by the time of their high school matriculation, written in plain language that students, parents, and teachers can understand
  • 162. Curriculum should focus on developing foundational competencies
  • 163. Teaching methods should focus on those that produce the best outcomes, such as phonics and proven math instruction methods
  • 164. The social studies curriculum should be taught without political bias, offering an objective understanding of Albertan, Canadian, and world history, geography, and civic literacy
  • 165. Financial literacy should be a mandatory element woven throughout the curriculum
  • 166. Consent must be taught as an essential part of the sexual education curriculum
  • 167. Reform student assessment so that students, parents, and teachers can clearly identify areas of strength and weakness
  • 168. Bring back Grade 3 Provincial Achievement Test
  • 169. Returning to a 50/50 split between Diploma and school grades for Grade 12
  • 170. Implement language and math assessments for students in grades 1, 2, and 3 to help both parents and teachers understand and assess progress in the critical early years, and remedy where necessary
  • 171. Require clear, understandable report cards
  • 172. Benchmark the Alberta education system against leading global jurisdictions
  • 173. Ensure teachers have expertise in subject areas by introducing teacher testing
  • 174. Expand options for schools to facilitate expertise
  • 175. Requiring that the education faculties in Alberta’s universities themselves require that teachers take courses in the subjects they will one day teach in schools
  • 176. Ensure that Alberta intervenes at all Canadian Energy Regulator hearings that affect Alberta oil and gas interests
  • 177. Reinforce the need for open, critical debate and thinking as key to lifelong learning
  • 178. Proclaim the Education Act (2012), taking effect on September 1, 2019
  • 179. Introduce a Choice in Education Act
  • 180. Affirm parents have primary responsibility for the education of their children
  • 181. Add to the preamble of the Education Act recognition of Section 26.3 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states that “parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children”
  • 182. Protect the status and funding of independent schools in legislation given that they save the public education system $168 million annually
  • 183. Lift the cap on the number of charter schools
  • 184. Lift charter school enrolment caps
  • 185. Allow charter schools to own property
  • 186. Treat charter schools as priorities above other possible uses for surplus public-school infrastructure
  • 187. Support and encourage an expansion of alternative programs in the public system
  • 188. Respect the constitutional right to separate schools
  • 189. Maintain funding for independent schools and home schoolers at current levels
  • 190. Encourage the sharing of busing and infrastructure where appropriate, while respecting the distinctive nature of both systems
  • 191. Ensure that requests from parents for blended homeschool programs are facilitated
  • 192. Amend the Education Act to implement the Leadership Quality Standards
  • 193. Reduce paperwork burden on teachers, principals, and other school staff, and reduce unnecessary regulatory burdens throughout the system
  • 194. Review and implement selected recommendations from the Task Force for Teaching Excellence including alternate pathways to certification, regular assessment of teacher performance and ensuring subject matter confidence
  • 195. Review the current funding formula to ensure that rural schools have adequate resources to deliver programs in an equitable way
  • 196. Reduce provincial red tape and mandates on universities and colleges, freeing them to innovate and compete more and comply with bureaucratic mandates less
  • 197. Measure labour market outcomes of post-secondary programs to identify the correlation between provincial subsidies and economic returns for taxpayers
  • 198. Encourage efforts by Alberta universities and colleges to attract more qualified foreign students. (Alberta post-secondary institutions are well below the national average, and leaders in the information technology sector report that their principal challenge is a shortage of labour with relevant skills)
  • 199. Establish the most effective intellectual property framework for the commercialization and entrepreneurial application of innovative research and development from Alberta’s universities and colleges
  • 200. Work with universities and industry associations to measure Alberta’s performance against leading global research and government networks in key innovation hubs like California, Texas, Israel, London, and Hong Kong
  • 201. Require all universities and colleges to develop, post, and comply with free speech policies that conform to the University of Chicago Statement on Principles of Free Expression
  • 202. Double the number of schools that CAREERS: Next Generation currently works with from 500 to 1,000 and quadruple the number of students and full-time apprentices from 1,567 to 6,000 by 2023 by providing CAREERS with over $6 million annually by 2022/23
  • 203. Dedicate $1 million for trades scholarships for 1,000 students who show promise in trades in high school
  • 204. Support the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology’s new collegiate in Edmonton with a $28 million contribution, and budget for $28 million to expand that model in Calgary and eventually to other centres
  • 205. Reform teacher certification to enable qualified tradespeople to teach and bring their skills to the classroom without requiring a full Bachelor of Education degree
  • 206. Modernize the Alberta Employment Standards Code to enable junior high school students to work in co-op programs on job sites
  • 207. Appoint a Skills for Jobs Task Force to report to the government on how to reform education in order to expand opportunities for vocational education and the skilled trades
  • 208. Increase support for Skills Canada Alberta with funding of $2 million over four years so that young Albertans can participate in its Skills Canada National Competition and demonstrate their skills and talent on the national and world stage
  • 209. Support the creation of an Alberta Trades Hall of Fame to honour Albertan tradespeople who have left their mark on our province through their work
  • 210. Expand the Women Building Futures program with $10 million over four years to support women who wish to pursue opportunities in the skilled trades
  • 211. Work with other provinces and territories to better harmonize provincial mobility for apprentices and skilled tradespeople
  • 212. Expand the apprenticeship model to other careers with emerging demand such as coding and green technologies
  • 213. Invite applications for vocation-focused charter schools
  • 214. Create a Premier’s Council comprised of vocational education leaders, trades unions, and other stakeholders to meet regularly with the Premier and relevant ministers to advance vocational education as a government priority
  • 215. Spend $10 million to hire 50 new prosecutors and support staff
  • 216. Enact the Public’s Right to Know Act
  • 217. Implement the United Conservative Alberta Rural Crime Strategy as outlined in our 2018 report
  • 218. Invest $5 million to increase access to Drug Treatment Courts as an effective way to help drug addicts leave the cycle of crime
  • 219. Conduct an immediate review of the current model of victim service delivery, victim assistance funding, and victim compensation to ensure there is necessary assistance to victims of crime
  • 220. Conduct an immediate review of the sufficiency of medical and forensic evidence gathering services in rural communities in cooperation with local police, Crown, and medical authorities, to determine what improvements are required - particularly concerning sexual assaults
  • 221. Develop and implement a specific Repeat Offender Policy with both provincial and federal components
  • 222. Negotiate additional Queen’s Bench Justice appointments with the federal government, including requesting that Grande Prairie be given its own Queen’s Bench justices, to help alleviate case waiting times
  • 223. Work with other provinces and the federal government to ensure the return of criminals apprehended on outstanding arrest warrants to the province from which they fled, which has been flagged as a particular problem in provinces like Alberta with overlapping and independent police forces
  • 224. Update the Crown Prosecutors’ Policy Manual to require that prosecutors provide the Court with an offender’s past criminal record and outstanding charges during bail hearings
  • 225. Direct a review of the Crown Policy Manual to ensure that appropriate consideration is given to whether the use of force defence in Sections 34 and 35 of the Criminal Code should preclude prosecution against victims of crime
  • 226. Review current Criminal Code sentencing principles to ensure and recommend that in rural crime offences, specific facts be considered by a sentencing court as aggravating factors, and that the principles of deterrence and denunciation be prioritized (particularly concerning the unique vulnerability of people in rural areas when it comes to their self defense
  • 227. Replace the Parole Board of Canada with an Alberta Parole Board for offenders serving a sentence of less than two years
  • 228. Launch a nine-point Alberta Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking
  • 229. Adopt the 2002 Protocol to Prevent, Suppress, and Punish Trafficking in Persons (the Palermo Protocol) definition of human trafficking, followed by an effort to have other provinces and the federal government adopt the same standard definition to create a common understanding across Canada of what constitutes human trafficking
  • 230. Create a provincial Human Trafficking Task Force
  • 231. Increase efforts to educate the public, particularly vulnerable groups, about the reality of human trafficking, and to report tips to the new National Human Trafficking Hotline
  • 232. Ensuring appropriate training for judges, prosecutors, and first responders including police officers, nurses, and doctors, to enhance detection of human trafficking and the prosecution of human traffickers, as well as improving support for victims
  • 233. Ensuring that the Department of Labour provides information to Temporary Foreign Workers in Alberta about their rights under Canadian law, assuring them that if they report an instance of human trafficking, they will not be subject to removal for the duration of their work permit
  • 234. Work with community groups, other provinces, and the federal government to collect and share better data on human trafficking, and to ensure coordinated action as part of the National Action Plan To Combat Human Trafficking
  • 235. Begin the naming and shaming of traffickers by publishing the names of businesses that have been found to have knowingly facilitated human trafficking
  • 236. Lobby the federal government to strengthen penalties against human traffickers by bringing into force Bill C-452, which amends the Criminal Code to impose consecutive sentences for trafficking in persons, and creates a presumption regarding the exploitation of one person by another (it also adds human trafficking to the list of offences to which the forfeiture of proceeds of crime applies)
  • 237. Pass the Human Trafficking Legislation (Saving the Girl Next Door Act)
  • 238. Establish a process for victims (or potential victims) to obtain restraining orders against their traffickers
  • 239. Establish a tort of ‘human trafficking’ so that victims may sue for damage against traffickers who have prayed on them
  • 240. Proclaim February 22 annually to be Human Trafficking Awareness Day, as part of a broader effort to raise awareness about the scourge of modern day slavery
  • 241. Pass an Alberta version of ‘Clare’s Law’
  • 242. Invest $2 million in specialised electronic monitoring technology to more fully prevent those serving sentences in the community from having contact with their victims
  • 243. Commit $5 million in new funding to combat sexual assault and provide services to survivors of sexual violence
  • 244. Provide an overall funding increase of $50 million over four years to the Alberta Law Enforcement Response Teams (ALERT), who deal with children’s exploitation, domestic violence, stalking, and gang issues, specifically to:
    - Double the funding for the Integrated Child Exploitation (ICE) Unit
    - Double the funding over four years to the Integrated Threat and Risk Assessment (I-TRAC) unit that helps combat domestic violence and stalking
  • 245. Work with ALERT to create a charitable foundation (akin to the Calgary and Edmonton Police foundations) which can then attract additional funds from the public
  • 246. Ensure mandatory anti-harassment training for members of the Alberta public service, agencies, boards, commissions, and Legislature
  • 247. Establish the Security Infrastructure Program, which will be modelled after a similar program Jason Kenney helped establish at the federal level
  • 248. Religious and ethno-cultural groups at risk of being victimized by hate-motivated crime will be eligible for matching grants of up to $100,000
  • 249. Adopt a Freedom to Care Act that allows for charitable and non-profit groups to apply for a “common sense exemption” from regulations that are designed primarily for commercial application where those regulations have the unintended consequence of preventing a social good from being performed
  • 250. Create a Premier’s Charities Council to advise the government on how best to assist the efforts of civil society groups
  • 251. Create a weekly Points of Light Award to recognize outstanding groups or individuals who exemplify Alberta’s spirit of volunteerism
  • 252. Create a $20 million Civil Society Fund supported by the Alberta Lotteries Fund to support innovative cost-shared programs delivered by community groups
  • 253. Partner with civil society organisations to deliver government programming and services where they can achieve results more efficiently and effectively
  • 254. Ensure that faith-based charities and non-profits have equal access to government grants and contributions
  • 255. Support projects like the Alberta Social Venture Initiative, and the Trico Foundation’s Social EnterPrize, a national award that celebrates the best and brightest of Canada’s social entrepreneurs
  • 256. Reduce bureaucratic burdens such as renewal obligations for proven civil society groups that deliver results for Albertans, including moving to five-year funding agreements if and where possible
  • 257. Maintain the most generous charitable tax credit of any province in Canada to incentivize charitable giving
  • 258. Prioritize capital funding for the immediate creation of new long-term care beds to community, non-profit, and independent providers
  • 259. Return to using the Affordable Supportive Living Initiative (ASLI) partnerships to ensure more units are built more quickly and cost-effectively
  • 260. Allow for the creation of innovative community options (more care at home, and new personal care homes (PCHs) with a maximum of 15 people) for seniors who need more care than can be provided at home alone but who require less care than provided at supportive living facilities
  • 261. Maintain all seniors’ benefits
  • 262. Create a $1.5 million Heroes Fund modelled on the federal Memorial Grant Program for First Responders that will provide a $100,000 top-up for Alberta families eligible under the federal program (which provides a maximum $300,000 lump sum, tax free benefit to an immediate family member of a police officer, firefighter, or paramedic who died as a result of performing their duties, including death by suicide)
  • 263. Work with the Government of Canada to improve services for first responders who have been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of their service and allocate an incremental $1.5 million annually to these efforts
  • 264. Create the $1 million Alex Decoteau Veteran’s Scholarship of Honour
  • 265. Update the 2004 Standards for Special Education to reflect new technologies and practices, to ensure accountability for quality inclusive education, and to protect a vision of parental choice
  • 266. Restore the Wellness Resiliency and Partnerships program (ended by the NDP government) to support children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder in schools with funding of $1 million/year
  • 267. Expand the successful Family Managed Supports (FMS) model by establishing four new family governed resource centres to serve St. Paul, Grande Prairie, Medicine Hat, and Edmonton families at $1.5 million/year
  • 268. Work with First Nations, other Indigenous communities, and the disability community to increase access to supports for Indigenous families who have children with disabilities
  • 269. Partner with First Nations and the Government of Canada to extend Alberta’s PDD supports to adults with developmental disabilities on reserves using, federal dollars as has been done for children’s FSCD supports
  • 270. Work with the disability community to develop an approach to personal and individualized disability-related supports by restoring the Persons with Developmental Disabilities (PDD) program to its pre-2009 eligibility criteria or by eliminating the existing division of age and access by incorporating PDD, the Brain Injury Initiative, FASD Networks funding and Family Supports for Children with Disabilities (FSCD) into comprehensive programming that is family and individual-centered
  • 271. Make the Government of Alberta a leader in hiring Albertans with disabilities
  • 272. Build on successful partnerships like Abilities at Work and the Rotary Employment Partnerships by providing $5 million/year for new partnerships to create job opportunities for persons with disabilities
  • 273. Provide $2 million for post-secondary opportunities for students with developmental disabilities
  • 274. Convene a Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) Action Group with members from the financial services industry, government, and the disability community. Allocate $500,000 annually to help Albertans open RDSPs and access the thousands of dollars in federal government grants and bonds available to them
  • 275. Support Albertans with disabilities to stay in their homes by reducing wait times and expanding access for Self-Managed Care and increasing funds available under the Residential Access Modification Program
  • 276. Maintain dollars promised to municipalities for 2019-20, as well as the multi-year agreement in the Bill 32 Charters for Calgary and Edmonton
  • 277. Ensure predictable, long-term infrastructure funding for municipalities
  • 278. Maintain key infrastructure commitments in the province’s capital plan, such as LRT extensions in Calgary and Edmonton
  • 279. Amend the MGA to allow municipalities to offer property tax incentives to attract investment and development
  • 280. Work with municipalities to facilitate pre-approved industrial zones to streamline regulatory approvals and decision-making
  • 281. Consult with municipalities on the province’s funding formula for police services, including any burden imposed on local law enforcement resulting from the recent legalization of cannabis
  • 282. Cut provincial regulation and paperwork for Alberta’s cities and allow municipalities to pass on those savings to taxpayers
  • 283. Improve local government financial reporting by preparing an annual Alberta Municipalities Measurement Index so Albertans can evaluate the performance of their local government in comparison with others on such key fiscal indicators as the property tax burden, revenues, spending, and debt
  • 284. Amend the Gaming, Liquor, and Cannabis Act (s.89) to give municipalities more flexibility to permit responsible adults to drink alcohol in parks, street festivals, or other areas – and begin with relaxing liquor constraints in a number of provincial parks
  • 285. Relax regulations that require enclosed events like folk festivals to keep those having a drink within unreasonably narrow zones like fenced-in beer gardens
  • 286. Reduce red tape burdens on home builders to lower the regulatory cost that has increased the price of new housing
  • 287. Re-purpose some of the capital funding for new and refurbished affordable housing projects into public-private partnership (P3) projects when we can be assured of getting more housing per tax dollar
  • 288. Expand the use of mixed-income housing that enables people, including seniors, to continue to reside in their communities
  • 289. Terminate the inefficient NDP Building Communities of Care grant program and restore the Alberta Supportive Living Initiative (ASLI) to build more community care facilities for fewer dollars
  • 290. Ensure that local municipal bylaws and rules provide flexible and affordable housing options for seniors, including unrelated seniors who want to live together and support each other in a single dwelling, as provided for in Ontario’s Golden Girls Act
  • 291. Revise the Municipal Government Act as needed to streamline the planning approval processes for affordable housing projects at the local level
  • 292. Seek an exemption from the Canada Home and Mortgage Corporation (CMHC) stress tests
  • 293. Encourage provincially-regulated financial institutions such as credit unions to return to pre B-20 mortgage underwriting standards, which are more appropriate for Alberta’s housing market
  • 294. Continue funding support for arts and cultural organizations
  • 295. Convert the Alberta Screen-Based Production Grant into a tax credit
  • 296. Incentivize media production in rural areas, following the lead of Manitoba’s film tax credit
  • 297. Adopt an Arts Professions Act modelled on the 2009 Saskatchewan statute, to give formal recognition to artists, their representative associations, their freedom of expression, and their economic – including contractual – rights
  • 298. Support the recommendation of the Canadian Artists’ Representation to have the federal Parliament amend the Copyright Act to require that a 5% royalty be paid to visual artists on the resale of their work
  • 299. Reprofile a portion of Alberta Lottery Fund revenue to support a Creative Partnerships Alberta program, emulating the success of Creative Partnerships Australia to:
    - Mentor and assist artists and arts organizations in generating income and support from the private sector
    - Build partnerships between the arts, philanthropy, and business sector
    - Establish a goal of growing Alberta cultural industries by 25%, or $1.5 billion over, the next decade
  • 300. Mentor and assist artists and arts organizations in generating income and support from the private sector
  • 301. Establish a goal of growing Alberta cultural industries by 25%, or $1.5 billion over, the next decade
  • 302. Support legal action for pro-resource groups in Indigenous communities with a $10 million fund
  • 303. Include Alberta’s Indigenous communities in our “Stand Up for Alberta” strategy to help energy projects and Indigenous communities both succeed and prosper
  • 304. Advocate for a federal Aboriginal consultation process that provides clear timelines and legal certainty for project proponents, consistent with the federal government’s constitutional obligations
  • 305. Add economic development rights to the preamble of the Alberta Aboriginal Consultation policy to explicitly consider support from Indigenous communities for projects that affect them
  • 306. Work with the federal government to streamline how Indigenous people access key services such as education and health care, including ensuring Indigenous students have access to a provincial education system (paid for with federal dollars) that enables students to succeed
  • 307. Replicate the successful education partnership in the agreement between Whitecap Dakota First Nation and Saskatoon Public Schools signed in 2014
  • 308. Facilitate First Nations financial participation in major resource projects
  • 309. Introduce an Alberta Trails Act to increase awareness about and encourage the sustainable use of trails, enhance trails and trail experiences, and protect trails for future generations
  • 310. Increase funding by 50% ($5 million) to the Alberta Land Trust Grant Program that conserves ecologically important areas, and preserve other program and policy priorities
  • 311. Protect creeks and streams on the Eastern Slopes by adding $1 million in funding (tripling provincial funding from $531,000) to the Alberta Riparian Habitat Protection Society’s “Cows and Fish” Program, while seeking matching funds from the private sector
  • 312. Apply a mandatory $30 trail permit fee to Off-Highway Vehicles (OHV) and camping trailers to pay for restoring and creating OHV trails and preventing damage in Alberta’s great outdoors, and to hire additional enforcement officers
  • 313. Implement a balanced back country land use plan to ensure all Albertans can enjoy public lands and appreciate the wilderness
  • 314. Review Alberta Environment and Parks legislation to modernize it for the 21st century
  • 315. Improve data collection on environmental outcomes relating to parks and public lands to ensure these lands meet the needs of Albertans in the 21st century in an environmentally sustainable way
  • 316. Ensure that more department staff work in the outdoors and with local stakeholders, including facilitating visitor enjoyment of the back country and conducting environmental monitoring
  • 317. Strengthen partnerships with non-profit park societies across Alberta, including setting aside $1 million over four years to pilot an expanded role with park societies
  • 318. Ensure all major economic development proposals continue to be subject to mandatory environmental impact assessments
  • 319. Ensure that in the future, all major environmental protection proposals will be subject to mandatory social-economic impact assessments to allow the government to strike the appropriate balance between economic growth and environmental protection
  • 320. Encourage and increase the use of development credits and conservation offsets in provincial development policy
  • 321. Create statutory tort action for adversely affected downstream private landowners, so they can more easily deal with illegal drainage of wetlands
  • 322. Enforce actions against “trespass farming”, i.e., protect 66-foot-wide public right of ways against conversion to crops or drainage of ditches next to rural roads
  • 323. Allocate $10 million over two years to create the Big Island Provincial Park along the banks of the North Saskatchewan River in Southwest Edmonton
  • 324. Pass a new Alberta Property Rights Protection Act that will further entrench the right not to be deprived of enjoyment or use of property without due process of law
  • 325. The Alberta Property Rights Protection Act will: Propose an amendment to the Constitution to enshrine property rights in Alberta
  • 326. The Alberta Property Rights Protection Act will: Amend the Land Titles Act to bar adverse possession claims so that Alberta no longer allows squatters to make legal claims to someone else’s property
  • 327. The Alberta Property Rights Protection Act will: Treat government regulation of real property the same as government expropriation for the purposes of compensation
  • 328. The Alberta Property Rights Protection Act will: Allow private property owners to convert government attempts to regulate property into an expropriation action if desired
  • 329. The Alberta Property Rights Protection Act will: Preserve the right of governments to expropriate and regulate for the public good
  • 330. Task a Legislature Committee with reviewing relevant legislation and government policies to determine what changes are needed to ensure compliance with property rights
  • 331. Ensure government departments and agencies, boards, and commissions account for any potential costs and/or loss of value to private property in new regulatory proposals
  • 332. Create a Property and Farmer’s Rights Advocate Office out of the existing two offices to reduce duplication of roles and operations and to provide more support for Albertans
  • 333. Introduce a Recall Act based on precedents in several jurisdictions, including the United Kingdom, the United States, and in British Columbia where the provision has existed since 1996
  • 334. Remove big money from Alberta politics by imposing a $30,000 limit on donor contributions to political action committees (PACs) and by closing the ‘AFL loophole’ by prohibiting groups formally affiliated with political parties from running PACs
  • 335. Establish a specific set election date
  • 336. Allow free votes for MLAs on everything not deemed a confidence vote or a key platform commitment
  • 337. Stop floor crossing by requiring that MLAs resign and seek a by-election before they can join the UCP Caucus
  • 338. Renew the Senatorial Selection Act and hold elections for Senatorial nominees in 2021
  • 339. Amend the Alberta Taxpayer Protection Act to require a referendum before any carbon tax can be introduced in the future
  • 340. Introduce the End Partisan Government Advertising Act, making it illegal for governments to advertise in the run-up to an election and to use tax dollars for partisan ads at any time
  • 341. Amend the Standing Orders of the Legislative Assembly to raise the bar of civility and decorum, banning “desk thumping” in the Legislative Assembly
  • 342. Immediately file a constitutional challenge to strike down Justin Trudeau’s “No More Pipelines” Bill C-69 (should it become law) as a violation of Section 92 of the Constitution Act
  • 343. Use the “Turn off the Taps” legislation should provinces, including British Columbia, continue to obstruct the construction of pipelines
  • 344. Build an interprovincial coalition of provinces which support jobs, pipelines, and our energy industry, making it a top issue in federal-provincial relations
  • 345. Hold a referendum on removing equalization from the Constitution Act on October 18, 2021 if substantial progress is not made on construction of a coastal pipeline, and if Trudeau’s Bill C-69 is not repealed
  • 346. Establish an ‘Energy War Room’ to respond in real time to the lies and myths told about Alberta’s energy industry through paid, earned, and social media
  • 347. Use the persuasive power of the Premier’s “bully pulpit” to tell the truth in both official languages across Canada and around the world about how Albertans produce energy with the world’s highest environmental, human rights, and labour standards
  • 348. Create a $10 million litigation fund to support pro-development First Nations in defending their right to be consulted on major energy projects
  • 349. Ask the energy industry to significantly increase its advocacy efforts
  • 350. Seek out and support Alberta energy companies that are willing to challenge the campaign of defamation by anti-Alberta special interests, similar to Resolute Forest Products’ defamation suit against Greenpeace for $300 million in damages
  • 351. When multinationals like HSBC boycott Alberta products, the Government of Alberta will boycott them
  • 352. Challenge the charitable status of groups that are funneling foreign money into anti-Alberta campaigns
  • 353. End any and all provincial government funding for groups involved in the “Tar Sands” campaign
  • 354. Launch a public inquiry under the Inquiries Act into the foreign sources of funds behind the anti-Alberta energy campaign
  • 355. Approve a law banning foreign money from interfering in Alberta politics, making it illegal for foreign entities to finance third party advertisers (also known as political action committees)
  • 356. Actively support and seek adoption of Senator Linda Frum’s Bill S-239, which would ban foreign money in federal Canadian politics
  • 357. Fire Ed Whittingham from his position at the Alberta Energy Regulator
  • 358. Use the prospect of a referendum on equalization as leverage for federal action to complete a coastal pipeline and to demand reforms to the current unfair formula
  • 359. Press Ottawa to increase the limit of the Fiscal Stabilization Fund to protect Alberta from major fiscal shocks
  • 360. Press Ottawa to convert the Canada Health Transfer (CHT) and Canada Social Transfer (CST) to tax points for the provinces, which would give Alberta more control over how revenue is raised and spent in these areas of provincial jurisdiction
  • 361. Take steps to end Alberta’s agreement to increase the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) payroll tax
  • 362. Lobby for reforms to Canada’s Employment Insurance program so that Albertans who lose their jobs are not applied to Alberta home buyers
  • 363. Challenge the federal government’s unfair one-size-fits-all approach to mortgages by demanding the Canada Mortgage and Home Corporation (CMHC) stress tests are removed from Alberta residents
  • 364. Seek to form federal and provincial agreement on resource corridors, which are pre-approved land corridors to expedite major resource project approvals; a key part of these corridors would be facilitating aboriginal co-ownership or financial participation, where relevant
  • 365. Partner with Premier of Manitoba, Brian Pallister, as a relentless champion of unfettered free trade, labour mobility, and regulatory harmonization by pressing the federal government to adopt a Charter of Economic Rights which would, “clarify the vital rights of Canadians to sell their goods and services and exercise their trades and professions in every part of Canada”
  • 366. End Alberta’s agreement with Parole Board of Canada and pass legislation to create an Alberta Parole Board
  • 367. Maintain operating spending at current levels as part of a realistic plan to balance the budget by 2022/23 without compromising core services
  • 368. Move Alberta closer to the provincial average in program spending per capita over four years as other provinces raise their spending to Alberta levels
  • 369. Formalize an annual spending review process within the budget and fiscal planning process to eliminate waste, duplication, and non-essential spending and create the fiscal space to fund key government priorities
  • 370. Lead by example, reducing the Premier’s salary by 10% and MLAs’ salaries by 5%
  • 371. Reverse the NDP plan to spend $3.7 billion leasing rail cars
  • 372. Cancel the NDP plan to spend $50 million to nationalize a private company with lab services
  • 373. Save $200 million by letting the private sector deliver laundry services to AHS
  • 374. Appoint an independent Blue-Ribbon Panel of experts to conduct a “deep-dive” into Alberta’s fiscal situation, recommend a path to balance and propose a realistic plan to start paying down the debt